Thursday, April 29, 2010

Bows and Arrows

Lag Ba'Omer, the 33rd day of the counting of the Omer, is a minor holiday on the Jewish calendar. Its observance commemorates the end of a tragic plague that took the lives of nearly all of Rabbi Akiva’s 24,000 students. It is also the yahrtzeit (anniversary of death) of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, the great Kabbalist and presumed author of the Zohar.

While Lag Ba’Omer is most commonly associated with the lighting of bonfires, another popular Lag Ba’Omer activity is archery. One does not usually associate a hunting tool/weapon of war with a Jewish holiday. The bow and arrow, however, remind us that Rabbi Akiva and Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai lived under the oppressive rule of the Romans after the destruction of the Holy Temple. In this era, these great Torah scholars were outlaws, since teaching Torah was forbidden under penalty of death. In fact, Rabbi Akiva lived during the famous Bar Kochba Rebellion, around 135 C.E.

Bar Kochba was a talented military leader, and he even managed to capture and rule a portion of Judea. So highly was he regarded that many, including great sages such as Rabbi Akiva, believed him to be the Messiah. The hope was shattered, however, when Bar Kochba was killed by the Romans during the capture of Betar. The association of Rabbi Akiva with Bar Kochba is one possible reason for the bows and arrows on Lag Ba’Omer.

Copyright © 2010 National Jewish Outreach Program. All rights reserved.

3 comments:

תום said...

actually, the reason I know is that the bow reminds us of the rainbow (both named "keshet" in hebrew).
the rainbow is the sign for humanity that G-D is "unpleased" but will not bring another flood.
there were 2 generations in which the rainbow didn't appear at all due to the righteousness of they're leaders - one of these was Rabbi Akiva whom on his time the rainbow wasn't seen...
therefore the children played with the bow to remember G-D's promise about the rainbow.

תום said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Romilda Gareth said...

Thanks